Focus on Settlement Agreements

In this series of articles I am going to focus on Settlement Agreements and answer the most Frequently Asked Questions that you may have. If there are any questions that are not covered please leave a comment, or send an email, tweet or Facebook message and I will add the answer.

What does it mean?

The Settlement Agreement once signed and agreed by you becomes a legally binding agreement, and therefore before you agree to the terms you should be sure that you understand the terms and agree with the promises that you are giving.

The Settlement Agreement is essentially a clean break between you and the Employer.

Does it mean I have definitely lost my job?

There are a number of circumstances when a Settlement Agreement will be offered and whether you lose your job or not will depend on your circumstances.

If you do not accept the Settlement Agreement terms, and you are employed at the time, your employment will continue until such times as you or your Employer take steps to end your employment.

Do I have to sign the Settlement Agreement?

The terms of the Settlement Agreement are voluntary and if you do not agree with them then you do not have to accept.

 Settlement Agreement

Where can I find more information?

ACAS have produced a code of practice which can be found on their website www.acas.org.uk which contains information about how a Settlement Agreement should be prepared and the discussions that take place around the Settlement Agreement.

Alternatively you can give me a call on 023 80982006, 01983 897003 or 07969 598080. I can also be contacted by email on Alison@realemploymentlawadvice.co.uk

Have you been given a Settlement Agreement and want to arrange an appointment to discuss ?

I offer appointments that are convenient for you & we can discuss your Settlement Agreement: in person, on the telephone, via Skype or facetime.

I can meet with you face to face in Southampton, Portsmouth, Eastleigh, Winchester, Fareham, Isle of Wight and surrounding areas.

Just give me a call, drop me an email, or send me a message via Facebook or twitter and we can arrange the best time and means of communication for you.

 

Please note that the information provided is a summary of the law at the time the article is written. Employment law changes regularly and you should ensure that you seek legal advice about your specific issue. Please do not rely on the content of this article.

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